Everything to know about Fabric and Textiles

Definition of Piqué


US English version

Fibre: Cotton, rayon, synthetics.

Weave: Lengthwise rib, English crosswise rib or cord weave.

Characteristics: A stiff ribbed cotton or other fabric. Originally was a crosswise rib but now mostly a lengthwise rib and the same as Bedford cord. Ribs are often filled to give a more pronounced wale (cord weave). Comes in medium to heavy weights. It is generally made of combed face yarns and carded stuffer yarns. It is durable and launders well. Wrinkles badly unless given a wrinkle-free finish. Various prices. Also comes in different patterns besides wales. Some of the patterns are birds eye (small diamond), waffle (small squares), honeycomb (like the design on honeycomb honey). When the fabric begins to wear out it wears at the corded areas first.

Uses: Trims, collars, cuffs, millinery, infants wear, coats, and bonnets, women's and children's summer dresses, skirts and blouses, shirts, play clothes, and evening gowns.



Derivation: French, past part. of piquer: ‘prick, irritate’, from Romanic

Definition of Piqué


UK English version

Fiber: Cotton, rayon, synthetics.

Weave: Lengthwise rib, English crosswise rib or cord weave.

Characteristics: A stiff ribbed cotton or other fabric. Originally was a crosswise rib but now mostly a lengthwise rib and the same as Bedford cord. Ribs are often filled to give a more pronounced wale (cord weave). Comes in medium to heavy weights. It is generally made of combed face yarns and carded stuffer yarns. It is durable and launders well. Wrinkles badly unless given a wrinkle-free finish. Various prices. Also comes in different patterns besides Wales. Some of the patterns are birds eye (small diamond), waffle (small squares), honeycomb (like the design on honeycomb honey). When the fabric begins to wear out it wears at the corded areas first.

Uses: Trims, collars, cuffs, millinery, infants wear, coats, and bonnets, women's and children's summer dresses, skirts and blouses, shirts, play clothes, and evening gowns.



Derivation: French, past part. of piquer: ‘prick, irritate’, from Romanic



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